Couples| Volunteers| Solo Travelers| Gap Year|

Trip starts Every  Sunday

A guided tour of Wanjohi Happy Valley offers a glimpse of the fascinating  waterfalls oozing from the Aberdare ranges. This now sleepy valley was the playground for English and some not-so-English aristocrats in the 1920s and 1930s. Welcome to once theater of actions,beautiful scenery, mountains, streams, and forest.

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Wanjohi Happy Valley Trip

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Couples| Volunteers| Solo Travelers| Gap Year|

Trip starts Every  Sunday

A guided tour of Wanjohi Happy Valley offers a glimpse of the fascinating  waterfalls oozing from the Aberdare ranges. This now sleepy valley was the playground for English and some not-so-English aristocrats in the 1920s and 1930s. Welcome to once theater of actions,beautiful scenery, mountains, streams, and forest.

$ 3,359 Tax included

$ 4,088 per person in own room

Day 1 Sunday Nairobi

Arrive at any time. Overnight at your Nairobi hotel.

Day 2 Home Stay (1B,1L,1D) approximately 150 km from Nairobi.

Kenya’s Happy Valley — popularised through books  (Ghosts of Happy Valley by Juliet Barnes, Child of Happy Valley by Junita Carberry and movies (White Mischief By James Fox), and better known as Wanjohi Valley in Nyandarua County — was the playground for English and some not-so-English aristocrats in the 1920s and 1930s. The key players included Idina Sackville, Lord Errol and a host of others 3rd Baron Delamere and his son and heir the 4th Baron Delamere , The Hon. Denys Finch Hatton , Sir Jock Delves Broughton and wife Diana Delves Broughton, Alice de Janzé (cousin of J. Ogden Armour) and her husband Frédéric de Janzé . Other less-known includes Gilbert Colville, Hugh Dickenson, Jack and Nina Soames, Lady June Carberry (stepmother of Juanita Carberry), Dickie Pembroke, and Julian Lezzard. Lord Errol’s death has remained a mystery and there is no sign it will ever be resolved. Enough has been written about the Happy Valley, but  its edges and the hills around it SIMPLY BREATHTAKING.  A venture beyond Happy Valley takes one through newly gravelled road from Ol Kalou past the former home of Happy Valley member Morgan Glenville, which is by Malewa River, the main feeder of Lake Naivasha, and up the escarpment. The view of Happy Valley to the south as you climbs the escarpment and Lake Ol Bollosat to the north is simply breathtaking. In Shamata, which in Maa language means ‘high place’, this cold place is to the east of Happy Valley. Here, other pioneer settlers, who were not as well-known as the Happy Valley lot, built elegant colonial houses. The very elegant house formerly owned by Nigel Trent and next to Aberdare Forest still remains intact. It offers a scenic view of the Laikipia plains, and the Rift Valley and its lakes. The house looks modest by Happy Valley standards. About four kilometres from Nigel’s house is Kaheho town which hosts another big colonial house nearby which is now demolished halfway and is part of a secondary school.

Spend days mesmering at the heydays and current political, social and enviromental landscape of Happy Valley, some 8 decades on.

Meals  and accommodation provided at the  host  family home.

Day 3  and 4  Homestay &Cultural fusion (2B, 2D)

After breakfast, Proceed to venture into the happy valley homes. A visit to Lake Olobolossat, weather permiting is a must.

In the chilly shadows of the Aberdare Ranges in central Kenya lies a tiny lake. Lake Ol Bolossat – the only lake in Kenya’s Central Province – is the source of the Ewaso Narok River which flows silently underground towards the Lorian Swamp before emerging and tumbling down the 75 metres (256 feet) Thomson Falls into the boulder strewn gorge below and eventually joining the Tana River and flowing east into the Indian Ocean.

It is located in Nyandarua county of Central Kenya, a beautiful unspoiled yet unexplored lake, and is home to several families of hippopotamus, and a temporary sanctuary for thousands of migrating birds.It has been recognized as a wetland that holds some of the threatened water bird species in Kenya Among these birds are several varieties of ducks, pelicans and the beautiful Ugandan Crested Crane and has been accepted as the 61st Important Bird Area (IBA) for Kenya. Framing this outstanding Lake is the ever imposing Aberdare Mountain Range, which provides an amazing back drop to the Rising Sun.
Lake Ol Bollosat is known for its peculiar habit of drying up and springing back to life in some ambiguous intermittent patterns


Lake Ol’ Bolossat,  is an internal drainage basin whose swamps have a high salt content possibly due to high evaporation rates and partly to the nature of sediments that constitute the area. The lake is situated in the valley between the northwestern slopes of Aberdares Mountains and Dundori Ridge which are the main catchments. The altitude ranges from 2,340 - 2,400 meters above sea level, receiving an average precipitation of 975 - 1,100 mm pa. The Lake covers an area of 43.3 sq.km. of which open water covers about 4 sq.km. This drainage basin, Ewaso Ngiro North Basin covering 210,226 sq.km., is Kenya’s largest. It offers a variety of habitats ranging from open water through fl oating marsh and swamps, open grasslands and riverine forests along rivers and springs that feed the lake

Meals  and accommodation provided at the host family home.

Day 5 Nakuru National Park (B,L,D)
After breakfast descend into the Great Rift Valley enjoying stunning views of the escarpment on the way, arriving in time for lunch. Lake Nakuru is a shallow soda lake, renowned for its huge concentration of flamingos and over 460 species of birds. After setting up camp, embark on an afternoon safari within Lake Nakuru National Park, a beautiful environment of woodlands and grasslands, in search of the resident black and white rhino, buffalo, impala, and the elusive leopard.

Lake Nakuru National Park began in 1961 as a small protected territory, only encompassing the famous lake of the same name, and the surrounding mountainous vicinity. Now it has been extended to include a large part of the area’s grassland savannahs and woodland slopes, and covers an area of roughly 188 km sq.

 

The park has recently been enlarged partly to provide the sanctuary for the black rhino. This undertaking has necessitated a fence - to keep out poachers rather than to restrict the movement of wildlife. The park now has more than 25 rhinos, one of the largest concentrations in the country, so the chances of spotting these survivors are better than in other parks. There are also a number of Rothschild's giraffe, again translocated for safety from western Kenya beginning in 1977. Numerous other mammals can be seen, including zebra, impala, gazelle, waterbuck, lion, warthog, bushbuck, many buffalo, and even at times leopard.
Overnight at your lodge

Day 6: Masai Mara National Reserve (B,L,D) 
After breakfast and a brief gamedrive as you head out of the park, you will drive through the Great Rift Valley on to Kenya's premier wildlife reserve. In the afternoon we will arrive in the area, and get settled at our safari lodge, our base for our time here. Then we head out for a late afternoon game viewing drive, with excellent chances of seeing the "Big 5" - lion, leopard, buffalo, elephant and rhino. The varied wildlife and natural environment come together to provide a spectacular safari experience.

The Masai Mara (also spelled Maasai Mara) is a game reserve in south-western Kenya, which is effectively the northern continuation of the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. Named for the Masaitribes people, who are the traditional inhabitants of the area, and the Mara River, which divides it, the reserve is famous for its exceptional population of game and the annual Great Migration of the wildebeest every September and October. The Great Migration is one of the most impressive natural spectacles in the world, involving an immensity of herbivores: some 1,300,000 wildebeest, 360,000 Thomson's gazelle, and 191,000 zebra.

 

The Masai Mara is perhaps most famous for its lions, though the other members of the "Big 5" are as well found. Hippo are found in large groups in the Masai Mara and Talek Rivers, and many cheetah, zebra, impala, gazelles, hartebeest, warthog, ostrich, topi and the Masai giraffe, among other mammals, all consider the “Mara” their home territory. As well, the large Roan antelope and the nocturnal bat-eared fox, rarely present elsewhere in Kenya, can be seen within the reserve borders. Like in the Serengeti in Tanzania, the wildebeest are the dominant inhabitant of the Masai Mara, and their numbers are estimated in the millions. Around July of each year these ungainly animals migrate in a vast ensemble north from the Serengeti plains in search of fresh pasture, and return to the south around October. These numerous migrants are followed along their annual, circular route by an entourage of hungry predators, most notably lions and hyena.
Overnight and meals  at your lodge

Day 7 Masai Mara Game Reserve (B,L,D)
We set off early this morning in order to witness the animal kingdom at its most active hour. Continue your safari in search for the park's large populations of wildebeest, buffalo, lion, elephants, and giraffes. Marvel at gazelles, impala and ostrich from wonderful vistas along the EsoitOloololo Escarpment. Before returning to your lodge, you may stop at a Masai village to learn about, and interact with, the local Masai people. You will also have a chance today or tomorrow to try the optional balloon safari, a fantastic once-in-a-lifetime experience.
Overnight and meals at your lodge

Day 8 Nairobi(B)
Spend the morning at the camp, then transfer back to Nairobi where the trip finishes upon arrival in the early evening.

 

"It was a time when the Wanjohi River, which meanders its way through Kenya's White Highlands, was said to flow with champagne." - The Telegraph

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Wanjohi Happy Valley Trip

Wanjohi Happy Valley Trip

Couples| Volunteers| Solo Travelers| Gap Year|

Trip starts Every  Sunday

A guided tour of Wanjohi Happy Valley offers a glimpse of the fascinating  waterfalls oozing from the Aberdare ranges. This now sleepy valley was the playground for English and some not-so-English aristocrats in the 1920s and 1930s. Welcome to once theater of actions,beautiful scenery, mountains, streams, and forest.

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